Rick Santorum at Sun City

The 6 most interesting quotes from Rick Santorum’s visit to Sun City

THE ISLAND PACKET: BY ZACH MURDOCK, June 29, 2015

Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum covered a lot of ground during his visit with Sun City Hilton Head residents on Monday afternoon.

But two clear focuses emerged from his hour-long discussion, and they’re both nuclear: The country’s social shift away from the traditional nuclear family and the threat of Iran’s nuclear capabilities.

Both are eating away at Americans’ security at home and few are prepared to address them, he argues.

“Nobody’s talking about what’s going on in America today because we’ve all been bullied into shutting up about it,” Santorum said. “Because it’s not politically correct to say those things, because you’re moralizing. You’re trying to impose your values.”

“Really?” he continued, raising his voice. “I’m trying to impose my values? America’s all about people imposing their values on everybody else. It’s called freedom. It’s called democracy. It’s our right to try to go out and argue for what we think is best and not be bullied.”

The appeal stuck a chord with more than 100 Sun City residents and members of the Sun City Republican Club, who cheered and clapped at points throughout the short speech and question-and-answer session at Pinckney Hall.

Santorum said afterward that he hopes some of his views separate him from the dozen other GOP hopefuls vying for the presidential nomination, but he admitted there’s more work to do to top his third-place finish in the Palmetto State’s 2012 Republican presidential primary.

Here are the six most important quotes from the former Pennsylvania senator’s speech Monday:

“The breakdown of the nuclear family and children being raised without fathers in the home is the principal reason people aren’t able to rise in society.”

Children raised in single-parent homes and neighborhoods are far less likely to achieve any kind of upward mobility — only 3 percent will go on to earn $85,000 a year, according to statistics Santorum cites.

More children are now growing up in homes with single parents than ever before, and Santorum blames that on the changing priorities and reasons for marriage.

Marriage is no longer about having children and a nuclear family, he said. The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling last week to make same-sex marriage legal across the country is evidence of that, he added.

“They’re saying marriage has nothing to do with children, it’s all about adults. It’s all about what’s best for adults. It’s not about creating an environment where children can have stable homes and be raised and the next generation be taken care of.”

Those changes are tearing the social fabric that Santorum says he grew up with and wants to retain. It’s also having ripple effects throughout the economy and social services, but the current administration and Congress have not addressed those issues, he said.

“We do nothing. Why? Because we can’t talk about this. Because then you’re pointing the finger at people and then you’re being mean … . We’re being so politically correct we won’t even fight for the lives of our kids.”

Santorum also opposes the Supreme Court’s ruling last week upholding the Affordable Care Act, but he also blames Republican colleagues.

“Conservatives have had many failings over the past 25 years, but I think the biggest failing we’ve had is to not lay out a vision for how we’re going to address (health care) … (President Barack) Obama was right; the system was broken, he just provided a remedy that broke it further.”

Santorum stuck with his pledge to repeal the health care law should he be elected, but he added that he would replace it with a system that incentivizes providers and patients in ways that keep costs down, he said.

But “the fight” of the future isn’t only at home, he added. The threat of Iran obtaining and using nuclear weapons is the most dire national security threat facing the country — more so than the Islamic State in Iraq, he said.

“America is probably as weak internationally as it has been since the days of Jimmy Carter or even before … (Iranian leaders) are serious about having a nuclear weapon and using it for the purposes of spreading radical Islam throughout the world. That’s how dangerous a path we’re on.”

The Iranian nuclear deal being negotiated now gives too much power to Iranian leaders, and Santorum said he hopes it fails. If it doesn’t, he would void the agreement should he take the White House, he added.

“People ask me, ‘Why are you running?’ … Because I don’t want to be looking at my kids and grandkids some day and say, ‘We were the generation that dropped the ball on America.’ Right now that ball is falling to the ground. We can still save it, but we’ve got a lot of work to do.”

Source

Paid for and authorized by the Beaufort County Republican Party.

Not Authorized by any Candidate or Candidate's Committee.